Think Before You Tweet

It’s that time of year when mothers wear big hats and graduates don caps and gowns to shake hands with their university Chancellors.

The temptation to pose for photos with that certificate in hand, then share share share on Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat is overwhelming and understandable.

Last year we warned against posting certificate selfies as they give fraudsters perfect templates to produce fake degree certificates. Google Images scoops them up and parades them online for eternity. We have issued a press release today to remind people, which media platforms are thankfully picking up.

We’re contacting all university social media teams to ask them to get the message out to their students and also not to re-tweet pictures of their graduates holding certificates.

It’s not just about fake certificates.There’s a serious, personal risk here too. As CIFAS reported today social media platforms are hunting grounds for identity thieves and there has been a 52% increase in identity fraud against under 30’s in the last 12 months alone.

Degree certificates contain personal information – full names, dates of birth (in some cases), places of study, titles, year of graduation. Information like this can be used to piece together someone’s identity for fraud and is as precious and private as a passport, a driving licence or bank details. None of us would put our passports online and we should treat certificates in the same way.

Post smiles, not certificates and stay safe.

Congratulations and appropriate emoticons, by the way.

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Published by

Jayne Rowley

Jayne is Chief Executive at Graduate Prospects and Hedd

One thought on “Think Before You Tweet”

  1. It would be easier for the universities to make their certificates resistant to forgery than to keep people from posting selfies. Why not include a longish “serial number” on each degree, one that can’t be guessed, and then offer registered universites or employers the ability to look up these numbers online to obtain a picture of how the certificate is supposed to look or the data that is supposed to be on it? That would foil those who want to just change the name. Your proposal is, I fear, impossible to implement.

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